July 13, 2018  

 

7:30pm
 
Gibson County
  Fair
 Princeton, Indiana
 
  Admission
$7
 

Track Side
Seating

Additional
$10
 
You may bring a lawn chair
 
Tickets available
 day of show

 

 

Gibson County Fair TOYOTA Concert

 
     
 

 

 

 
 

 
 

 
 

9:00 PM

7:30PM

 
 

"I hear the crowd, I look around, and I can't find one empty chair. Not bad for a girl going nowhere" sings Ashley McBryde on "Girl Goin' Nowhere," the seminal title track from her forthcoming LP. They're words built from experience: over the course of her life, McBryde's been finding her own way to fill those seats and sway those hearts since the very first time her teacher told her that her dreams of writing songs in Nashville would never see the light of day. Every time she was brought down, she persevered; trusting her timeless tone and keen, unwavering eye for the truth. It paid off. In April, Eric Church brought her on stage and called her a "whiskey-drinking badass," confessing that he's a massive fan. The rest of the world is quickly catching on, too.

Dubbed as one of Rolling Stone’s “Artists You Need To Know," citing she's "an Arkansas red-clay badass, with the swagger of Hank Jr. and the songwriting of Miranda Lambert," McBryde fearlessly lays it all on the line, and it's that honest all-in approach that has led to NPR critic Ann Powers to ask if McBryde could be "among the first post-Stapleton country stars?" McBryde's album will showcase an artistic vision that will prove her to be one of the genre's keenest working storytellers, bringing unwavering honesty back into a pop-preoccupied genre. Pulling tales from every corner of her human experience, McBryde sings with fire and fury, laughing and swigging that brown stuff along the way.

McBryde was raised in Mammoth Spring, Arkansas. At three, she'd secretly pluck her father's guitar like an upright bass, and after about the 17th time being caught, her father bought her a guitar of her own. When she was twelve, she played her parents and grandparents her very first composition. It was at Arkansas State when, while a member of the marching band, McBryde finally started sharing her voice with others, and finally moved to Nashville in 2007 where steadily worked a circuit of dive bars, biker hangouts, and colorful joints fighting to have her songs heard.

Her first EP, the self-released 2016 Jalopies and Expensive Guitars was just a taste of what McBryde can do, and, on her full-length debut, she will meld her songwriting chops with the vision of producer Jay Joyce, peppering her tales with a touch of guitar-driven rock fury. McBryde isn’t afraid to tell the truth, get raw and real and use the spirits of country, folk and rock when it serves her greater purpose. And that's to tell the stories that shake us, make us and tell us a little more about what it's like to be human.

 

 

 

There are brothers in blood, and then there are brothers in spirit. Jordan Walker and Johnny McGuire may not look like family or share a last name, but you wouldn’t know it by hearing them sing.

Signed to BBR Music Group’s Wheelhouse Records as the new duo Walker McGuire, Jordan and Johnny take an opposites-attract approach to their music, fusing electrifying “brotherly” harmonies with a fresh new take on modern country.

After meeting onstage at a writers round just days after moving to Nashville, Jordan – the “super country” guy, raised in Texas with a love for classics like Keith Whitley and Dan Seals – and Johnny – the quintessential “rootsy” guy, a Kansas City native schooled by left-of-center icons like Tom Petty and John Prine – discovered a
yin-and-yang musical connection that fit together like puzzle pieces – and the duo Walker McGuire was born.

“If you put us in a room with 100 people and everybody listed the kind of music they grew up on, there’s no way you would put us together,” Jordan explains with a laugh. “It was one of those written-in-the-stars things you just can’t deny.”

Aside from the differences in taste, the duo even look like polar opposites – Jordan in an ever-present ball cap and cowboy boots and Johnny in his laid-back bohemian threads – but their vocal blend has a chemistry that could melt steel, a match of crystal-clear and raspy tenors that recalls sibling-harmony greats.

Since solidifying their bond, Walker McGuire have set to work honing their sound on the road, building an
under-the-radar fanbase and playing close to 300
cross-country shows each year.

“The sound ranges from those old-school ballads to really uptempo, in-your-face pop-country rock,” Johnny explains.

“We tell people, if you took Keith Whitley and Tom Petty and intersected them at Matchbox 20, that’s kind of what we’re going for,” Jordan adds.

Far from a copy-cat act, though, Walker McGuire write story songs with in a modern country style that is 100 percent their own – rooted in classic themes and sounds, but with an added touch of wit and sometimes flat-out comedy.

“When we started writing together, we didn’t have some guy who already had a few No. 1s saying ‘Hey, I’ve got a system,’” says Jordan. “We just did our own thing and now people are saying ‘Hey, what are these guys doing?’”

What they’re doing has already turned heads. Since earning placement on Spotify in Spring of 2016, “Til Tomorrow” has been streamed nearly 15 million times – which the guys playfully jest is way more times than they could click on it.

The buzzworthy hit captures the see saw of emotions we all struggle through after a breakup, even months later.

“We wrote it like we were sitting on a barstool, ordering drinks like ‘I’m fine. I’m good. I don’t need her,’” Jordan explains. “But in the morning you wake up and it hits you like a ton of bricks, you check your phone and you’ve texted them in the middle of the night.”

The duo has much more on tap, like the tender but playful “Mysteries of the World,” co-written by the guys - about the against-all-odds nature of true love (plus other mysteries, like where socks in the dryer go, D.B. Cooper and more).

Meanwhile, “Best Kinda Bad” (another Carper co-write) tackles the flip side of attraction, an epic up-tempo about a girl who’s all wrong, but too good to forget.

Guided by veteran producer Mickey Jack Cones (Dustin Lynch, Joe Nichols), these odd-couple “brothers” are each talented artists in their own right. But when put together, they’re simply unforgettable. More than 200,000 miles in a beat-up van has introduced their once-in-a-generation sound to fans across the country, and now its time to take the next step. But even though they’re out of the van, into a bus and working on their debut release, some things will never change.

“At the end of the day, you can impress your peers in Nashville with the songs you wrote, but can you go out and entertain the guy who just worked 9 to 5 and really doesn’t even want to be there, but his wife dragged him out?” Jordan asks. “That’s the big picture.”

 

 

 

 

Presented By:

Your Local Indiana

TOYOTA

Dealers

 

 

Toyota Motor
Manufacturing Indiana

Woody's Web Designs 
Princeton, Indiana, Princeton Indiana, IN, Princeton IN, Gibson County, Gibson, Fair, Gibson County Fair, Fairgrounds
Carnival, queen,  Princeton, Fort Branch, Francisco, Haubstadt, Oakland City, Hazleton, Terre Haute, Mackey, Patoka, Evansville, Somerville, Owensville 
 Ashley McBryde and Walker McGuire, Toyota, TMMI, Concert Music,